United States - light rail and trams

AATA Baltimore

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Only a limited number of US cities have tram traffic. This page shows a selection of them. In many cases it is difficult to say if the systems should be called trams or streetcars as the term in USA often is, or rather light rail vehicles. Often they are crosses of trams and "real" trains in their nature.

Our first picture is from Baltimore, an AATA tram. Picture 29.3.2009 by Sanna Siissalo.

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An AATA light rail tram in downtown Baltimore. Picture 29.3.2009 by Sanna Siissalo.

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Another AATA light rail tram. Picture 29.3.2009 by Sanna Siissalo.

Dallas light rail

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Dallas light rail emerging from the Mockingbird Lane portal. Copyright Dan Weissmann, (2k) Uploaded Feb 4, 1999

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Southbound Dallas light rail at the Mockingbird Lane station, late 1997. Copyright Dan Weissmann (3k) Uploaded Feb 4, 1999

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Dallas light rail waits at the Pearl Street station in downtown Dallas, 1997. Copyright Dan Weissmann (4k) Uploaded Feb 4, 1999

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Dallas LRT at Ledbetter station terminus, late 1998. Copyright Dan Weissmann (7k) Uploaded Feb 4, 1999

Fort Collins Municipal Railway

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Fort Collins Municipal Railway #21 at City Park, Fort Collins, Colorado taken in 1992. Photo by Roger Mitchell, Vice President and Master Mechanic FCMRyS. Uploaded Feb 14, 1996

Fort Worth Tandy Subway

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Fort Worth Tandy Subway leaving the downtown tunnel, 1985. Copyright Dan Weissmann (2k) Uploaded Feb 4, 1999

Los Angeles metro

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Los Angeles Metro is not a real metro, but a light rail system with fairly metro-like stations, but with trains which are like crosses of metro trains and trams. Los Angeles Metro blue line train stopping at the Willow station between Los Angeles and Long Beach. Picture 29.10.2016 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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Another Blue line LA metro train approaching Willow station, coming from Long Beach and heading towards Los Angeles. The trains are quite regular trams otherwise, but the doors are very high up and metro-like. Many of the trains are totally covered by advertisement tapings. Picture 29.10.2016 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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Both trains at the same time meeting at Willow station. Picture 29.10.2016 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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Los Angeles Metro blue line train leaving the Willow station between Los Angeles and Long Beach. Picture 29.10.2016 by Ilkka Siissalo.

MTA Baltimore

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Maryland Transit Administration MTA has some of the same trams as AATA of Baltimore and partly they also run combined, like in this picture taken 29.3.2009 by Sanna Siissalo. In Baltimore these are often also referred to as light rail rather than trams.

San Francisco international airport

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San Francisco international airport also has an automated metro running on rubber wheels connecting the various terminal buildings. This is the metro depot. Picture 17.3.2006 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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One of the San Francisco international airport's metro trains approaching a station. Picture 17.3.2006 by Ilkka Siissalo.

Seattle Link light rail

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Seattle city in Washington state has in addition to tram lines, also a light rail system called Link light rail. It runs from the Angle Lake area in the south via the Seattle-Tacoma airport to the city center and then under the whole downtown in a long tunnel and further north up to the university campus area. The trains look like crosses between a very broad tram and a Stadler GTW or FLIRT train with a small motorised section in the middle and with the passenger coaches at both ends without motorisation. A typical Link train is two units long, but during rush hours there may be three units in a train. This picture is from the SeaTac airport Link light rail station 17.2.2017 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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This shows a bit better the very small motorised "coach" in the middle of the Link unit. Picture is from the SeaTac airport Link light rail station 17.2.2017 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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One of the Link units had received a metallic ad taping. Picture is from the SeaTac airport Link light rail station 17.2.2017 by Ilkka Siissalo.

Seattle streetcar

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Seattle city in Washington state has now two distinct tram lines, the First hill streetcar and the South Lake Union streetcar. This is the First hill line. Some of the trams are pink, some are yellow and some are totally covered by ad tapings. The first hill line is 4,0 km long and has 10 stops. Notice that the trams rolling downhill keep their pantographs down. Picture by Seattle King street station 13.2.2017 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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Another picture of a pink tram rolling downhill. Picture by Seattle King street station 13.2.2017 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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One of the yellow trams on the First hill line. Seattle has three trams of the type Inekon 12-Trio and seven of the type Inekon Trio 121. Picture by Seattle King street station 13.2.2017 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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One of the fully ad taped trams on the First hill line. Picture by Cherry street Seattle 13.2.2017 by Ilkka Siissalo.

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One of the South lake union line trams of Seattle, fully covered by advertisement tapings of the Seattle university. Picture by Seattle Westlake 13.2.2017 by Ilkka Siissalo.
In addition to these two existing tram lines, Seattle city is already planning to extend the tram network by two more lines, which will also run through the entire city center.

Seattle-Tacoma international airport

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Seattle-Tacoma international airport in Washington state uses fully automated metro trains that run on rubber wheels to connect the different terminals. Picture at SEATAC 1.11.2008 by Ilkka Siissalo.
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